Creative Tots Artist Of The Month (Dec) – Alberto Giacometti

Let’s get caught up…Shall we?  🙂  Last month’s in class Art Enrichment took us on a journey exploring the artwork of Alberto Giamcometti.

Alberto Giacometti (October 1901  – January 1966) was a Swiss sculptor, painter, draughtsman, and printmaker.  Giacometti was born in Borgonovo, now part of the Swiss municipality of Stampa, near the Italian border.  Giacometti was a key player in the Surrealist art movement, but his work resists easy categorization. Some describe it as formalist, others argue it is expressionist. Even after his excommunication from the Surrealist group, while the intention of his sculpting was usually imitation, the end products were an expression of his emotional response to the subject. He attempted to create renditions of his models the way he saw them, and the way he thought they ought to be seen. He once said that he was sculpting not the human figure but “the shadow that is cast.”

Take a look at the work of Alberto Giacometti below.  You can also click here to view some more artwork by Alberto Giacometti.

Our Art Tots discovered all about Giacometti’s work.  We discussed how Giacometti would study his models and how they moved as they walked, stood and interacted around his studio.  He became very interested in the way the human body would balance itself as it acted out these tasks.  Too much weight shifted to one side forced the body to naturally shift weight the opposite direction to stay upright.  Our Art Tots got to try a few poses out on their own to see how the body moved to balance itself.  Our Art Tots discovered what “sculpture” meant.  A sculpture is an artwork that could be seen by all sides or “in the round”.  Some artists just put so much into their work that they just didn’t want anyone to miss it from any angle.  🙂  We also discussed how Giacometti would create his metal sculptures by looking at this model or person posing for him and create what he saw…  now this also meant that he might see it differently than another artist or person in the room.

In his drawings and painting, Giacometti had the same theory or idea.  He worked quickly with lots of squiggly lines so he won’t miss any movement.  He believed that, mistake or not, every line should remain in the artwork as a growing history of how it came to be.

With this thought in mind, Art Tots created this month’s art projects.  Pre-K and Preschool Art Tots explored Giacometti’s sculptures as they used pipe cleaners for their armature or skeleton and aluminum foil as their sketchy metal surface.  Preschool’s modeled their sculptures from Giacometti’s dog and the Pre-K tried their hand at his human sculptures.  Our Early 3 and Toddler classes concentrated on Giacometti’s sketchy drawings and color palette.  Toddlers moved their hand around the paper capturing the movement with squiggles of gray and black.  Our Early 3s showed wonderful fine motor control as they used the templates to squiggle in their head and eyes.

Take a look below for examples of each age group’s wonderful projects!!

Don’t forget that I am holding on to our Art Tots work from in class Art Enrichment to display in our fabulous Art Show in March.  Mark your calendars for this unforgettable event.

Alberto Giacometti

Alberto Giacometti

Alberto Giacometti

Alberto Giacometti

Pre-K Sculpture inspired by Alberto Giacometti

Pre-K Sculpture inspired by Alberto Giacometti

Preschool Sculpture inspired by Alberto Giacometti

Early 3s Drawing inspired by Alberto Giacometti

Toddler Drawing inspired by Alberto Giacometti

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook!  Creative Tots Preschool Mason

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: